Chaya’s Basic Pasta Recipe

My Simple and Quick Pasta Recipe

 

A Stinging Nettle Recipe for Homemade Pasta

 


This is my go to recipe for pasta.

Yes,  you get flour on the counter.  Maybe a dusting of it on the floor, too.  


                                                         Chaya holding pasta strands

 

You can, however, have a gourmet meal with little more than egg, water, and flour, and the investment of perhaps 15 minutes.  


                                                                           Children love helping

 

 To children, it is like mom sanctioned play-dough–and no one yells at you for eating it!  For dad, it is a comfort food that provides the smell of garlic throughout the house when he arrives home hungry and ready for family time.

 

                                                                         adding Stinging Nettle to pasta

 

 For mom, you know that you are feeding your family the freshest (and most economical) meal of the week.  You can even sneak in those otherwise-slimy green vegetables the kids will not eat.  This time, I added Stinging Nettle for a serious boost of nutrition.  Stay tuned for the next blog on cooking with Stinging Nettle

 

                                                      Adding Greens to pasta 

 

 In our house, Mom, Dad, and the children all participate in making batches of homemade pasta.

 

                                                                       Using my Atlas pasta machine

 

 

                                                                       homemade pasta noodles

 

 

 Sometimes we put it into the dehydrator for a quick meal another day…but we must always plan to cook a batch right away for that instant gratification.  I have not always found a lot of ways to enjoyably eat Stinging Nettle, but this is one Stinging Nettle recipe that is kid approved.


                                                                       finished pasta

 

 

Homemade Pasta Recipe 

 (serves 4)

 

4 eggs

1 cup water

4-4.5 cups freshly milled flour (soft white, hard white or durum wheat)

Spinach, Stinging Nettle, or other vegetables (optional)

 

Step 1:  Beat eggs.

Step 2: Add 1 cup water

Step 3:  Add 1 cup flour and stir well

Step 4:  Add in chopped greens or other vegetable as desired.

Step 5:  Add in the remainder of flour until pasta is very malleable like bread dough.  Knead for approximately 5 minutes until a smooth texture.

Step 6:  Roll out with rolling pin and feed through Atlas pasta machine.

Step 7:  Let pasta rest on counter as long as desired.  Boil for approximately 3 minutes.

Step 8: Serve with either butter and garlic or a sauce of your choice.

 

Enjoy–

Chaya

 

Looking for other fresh-milled bread recipes and help?

High Altitude Bread Baking and Recipe

 Homemade Bread Recipe–Pantry Paratus Style

 What I Put In My Bread–The Why

 Basics of Bread Baking–An Interview with Chaya’s Mentor

 Pantry Paratus Pita Bread Recipe

 Is Home-Ground Flour “Processed” Food?

Whole Wheat vs. Hole Wheat 

 

Proviso:

Nothing in this blog constitutes medical advice.  You should consult your own physician before making any dietary changes.  Statements in this blog may or may not be congruent with current USDA or FDA guidance.



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About Chaya Foedus

Flour on the ceiling. The ugliest vintage apron collection you've ever seen. And an affinity for old-fashioned kitchen skills that center on health, preparedness, and family meal-time. I am passionate about helping people find their kitchens and then teaching them what to do once they get there.

2 thoughts on “Chaya’s Basic Pasta Recipe”

  1. cheryl reese says:

    I have searched and searched, when making homemade pasta can I add my vegetable powders beet, spinach carrot or sweet potato to the flour then add my eggs, would this count as measurement of the flour

    1. Chaya Foedus says:

      No, don’t count them as a measure of flour or you might end up with a gloppy mess… This is what I do instead, I add the dry powders to the flour, and keep increasing water by the tablespoonfuls until I get the consistency I know I need to make dough. If you use less flour, your dough could instead become cakey (if you’re using eggs and you don’t use enough flour to keep the ratio right) or it could become gooey. I think, in the end, you’d be adding more flour to get it manageable.

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