Modern Day Victory Gardens, Guest Post from Dr. Bones & Nurse Amy

Modern Day Victory Gardens

 

Guest Blog from Dr. Bones & Nurse Amy

 

Chatting with us about seeds and being self-reliant

 

 

Victory Garden

 

On loan to us today is the Good Dr. Bones & Nurse Amy from DoomandBloom.net.  They are sharing this great article here with us today on the modern day Victory Garden.  You can get to know them a bit better by listening in to our podcast with Dr. Bones & Nurse Amy.  Please check out their website, they are a wealth of knowledge and some pretty darn good folks too!

 


 

 


Hey Prepper Nation,

 

During WWII, we experienced a number of shortages, and food was one of them.  The government encouraged us to plant Victory Gardens to grow food, supplementing our diet and encouraging self-sufficiency. In all, 20 million gardens were planted!   Today, more and more people are starting their own home vegetable gardens, and this is very good news!  Even First Lady Michele Obama has joined the club, setting up and maintaining a vegetable garden on the White House grounds.  Even if you do not care for the current administration, this is one thing that, without a doubt, they have gotten right.


FLOTUS garden


Victory Gardens of WWII or the modern day kinds are a great way to learn those skills that your grandparents (or great-grandparents) were proficient at, but that we have mostly lost.  Given our dependence on technology, we have not felt the need to learn basic things like growing our own food, and we are poorer for it.  I do not just mean money-wise, I am talking about the sense of accomplishment you get from planting a seed and holding a veggie in your hands that exists because of your commitment to become self-reliant!  Taking the time to learn to care for plants, save seeds and develop food producing skills is a gift you can give to yourself.  Even if you are talking money, look at the prices in the grocery store for some of the things that you could grow in your garden.  That ain’t chicken feed!


We have been spoiled by long-distance food transport.  How amazing is it that we can buy bananas in Montana in January?  We will not be able to depend on this if a collapse occurs one day, so learn what grows in your area at what time of year.  Try to grow different vegetables, see what works in your garden.  Getting through the learning curve in growing food is something that should be done now, so that you will be an accomplished grower by the time you actually need to be to able to survive by what you produce.


Victory Garden 2


Anyone can learn to grow food.  Even if you live in a small apartment in New York City, you have enough space on your kitchen counter to grow a nutritious “crop” of sprouts.  If you have a balcony or a patio, you can grow vegetables in containers.  Even if your soil is not perfect, you can place a raised bed or two in your yard, and get some good soil and compost into it.  There is a lot of ways to get a garden together; make yours that special place where you can sit, read a book, and get back to nature.





Humans have a natural curiosity to learn new things.  Use yours to read some homesteading articles. Learn how to make good soil, and put some seeds in the ground and start your own victory garden.  Theodore Roosevelt once said: “9/10ths of wisdom is being wise in time”.  Be a Victory Gardener, and I promise you will be plenty wise in plenty of time.  If Nurse Amy and I can do it, YOU sure can!


Dr. Bones


Wilson, Chaya, Nurse Amy and Dr Bones

 

Photo Credits:

Victory garden photos taken from original blog post on DoomandBloom.net

Doom and Bloom icon is from DoomandBloom.net

First Lady Michelle Obama in the Garden by Whitehouse.gov  http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2010/10/22/first-lady-s-fall-2010-kitchen-garden-harvest

Photo of Wilson, Chaya, Nurse Amy and Dr Bones by Pantry Paratus

 

Proviso:

Although Dr. Bones is a real Medical Doctor, nothing in this blog constitutes medical advice.  You should consult your own physician before making any dietary changes.  Statements in this blog may or may not be congruent with current USDA or FDA guidance.

 

About Chaya Foedus

Flour on the ceiling. The ugliest vintage apron collection you've ever seen. And an affinity for old-fashioned kitchen skills that center on health, preparedness, and family meal-time. I am passionate about helping people find their kitchens and then teaching them what to do once they get there.

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