A Recipe & 10 Uses for Tzatziki Sauce

When fresh dill is in season, we usually have homemade tzatziki sauce on the ready.  We eat it on anything and everything, but in case you were wondering what you should use tzatziki sauce for, here are my top suggestions:

fresh dill

  • Make gyros (or Turkish doner kepabs, very similar)!
  • Use as a veggie dip for cucumbers, carrots, tomato slices
  • Delicous “chip dip” for your homemade dehydrated snacks like dehydrated tomatoes and zucchini chips
  • Serve with fish, especially if you need to cut a too-strong flavor
  • Eat it on crackers
  • Meat! Any meat…meatballs (amazing!!), pork chops, etc.  Just stick with basic Greek or Italian seasonings, such as Basil, Chervil, Sage, etc
  • Fried zucchini
  • Fried eggplant
  • Healthy and more flavorful alternative to mayonnaise on sandwiches
  • Use as a “base” to other cold salads (pasta salads, mix some into potato salad, etc)

Tzatziki sauce

Refrigerator Life of Tzatziki

When it hits the spot, you’ll eat it all within a few days.  Good thing, or make less.  You’ll need to stir it up about every time you want to use it because you will find the lemon juice and yogurt whey separate from the thicker sauce.  Plan on using it within 3-4 days.

In only 10 minutes, you can make it for yourself!

Some people swear that it must be made with mint instead, but dill is how I fell in love with it, and so dill it is.  You may do what you like, the recipe below is the same either way (just substitute mint for dill in the same amounts).

Tzatziki Recipe

  • 1/2 cucumber, grated
  • 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1/2 lemon or 1-2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup thick, plain yogurt
  • 3-4 tsp fresh dill or mint, or only 2 tsp dehydrated of dill or mint
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • Optional: Some people add 1 tsp vinegar (I don’t, too runny)
salt grated cucumber and strain
salt grated cucumber and strain
  1.  Shred half of a cucumber, knead salt into it, and squeeze and strain out as much liquid as possible.  Leave it in a strainer to finish draining for 5-10 minutes.
  2.  Use the thickest yogurt that you can; if it is not thick, best practice is to let it drain in cheesecloth, too.
  3. Mix garlic, yogurt, lemon juice, dill and salted cucumber.  You can serve immediately but best chilled.
  4.   In regards to lemon, vinegar, salt, & garlic–really, make the flavor to suit your palate.  We like a lot of garlic at our house, you may want to try 1 clove first, and add to taste.

3 thoughts on “A Recipe & 10 Uses for Tzatziki Sauce

  1. I didn’t have mint so I used crushed rosemary. Delicious!!!

  2. I make mine without the cucumber because the cucumber is what shortens the life span of tzatziki and causes liquid to separate out. The cucumber can be stirred into a portion as you use it. As a topping for hot dishes like soup, I don’t bother with the cucumber at all. Used as a dip with pita or crackers, the cucumber definately gives it a fresher, lighter taste. I probably ought to mention that when I make a batch, I use an entire large carton of Greek yogurt. If you are only making 1/2 cup at a time, being able to keep it for more that a couple of days isn’t an issue.

  3. I started using “Zoi” Greek Yogurt thick and fatty. Works the best and doesn’t have so much
    runny liquid although when prepared in jar, some liquid remains and I just drain out.
    Strain and remove seeds with spoon of cucumbers. English type is much better to use and firmer
    texture plus it last longer in frig then regular Cucs. Fresh Dill is best to use, plus after blanching it few seconds, it freezes well in freezer bags for months. Fresh Mint is far better then the dry stuff.
    Ground Lamb meat would make good Burgers with this Tzatziki sauce, even without a roll.

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